Class Information

 

I taught COSC-374 (old numbering), Operating Systems in Spring 2011.


From the course catalog:


This course studies the software systems that provide the interface between the computer system hardware resources and the users of the system. This interface is composed of a large collection of programs that provide simplified and uniform access to information storage (data and programs on tape, disk, and in memory), processing elements (CPUs and remote computers), input/output devices (telecommunications, keyboards, mice, video displays, printers, etc.), and data acquisition and equipment control devices. Topics include, processes and threads of execution, concurrent process synchronization, concurrent access to hardware resources, file systems, memory management and virtual memory, job scheduling, system modeling and performance evaluation, network communication and protocols, and computer and network security. A variety of example operating systems of different types will be examined and their characteristics compared. Prerequisites: COSC-173 and COSC 251. Spring.


Prerequisites

A note on the prerequisites: I am assuming you really did take COSC 250 and 251 and have some clue about how computers operate. Likewise, I am assuming you can navigate basic data structures and can program in C or C++. There will be at least three, not-insignificant programing projects over the course of the semester.


Textbook

Silberschatz, Galvin, Gagne, Operating System Concepts, Wiley, Eighth Edition. ISBN 978-0470128725. The soft-cover international edition is fine. It is what I use, and it is less than half the price of the new hardcover edition.

Class information: Spring 2011

Information Warfare (COSC-411)


Class Web Site: https://people.cs.georgetown.edu/~eburger/COSC411


From the course catalog:

This course will study the nature of information warfare, including computer crime and information terrorism, as it relates to national, economic, organizational, and personal security. Students will gain an understanding of the threats to information resources, including military and economic espionage, communications eavesdropping, computer break-ins, denial-of-service, destruction and modification of data, distortion and fabrication of information, forgery, control and disruption of information flow, electronic bombs, and psyops and perception management. They will learn about countermeasures, including authentication, encryption, auditing, monitoring, intrusion detection, and firewalls, and the limitations of those countermeasures. They will learn about cyberspace law and law enforcement, information warfare and the military, and intelligence in the information age. Information warfare policy and ethical issues will be examined.


Format

This course brings in a number of guest lecturers from the military, government, industry, and academia. As such, missing a class or not reading materials before class could really impact your chances of success in the course.


Prerequisites

There are no prerequisites for the course. However, there can be a considerable amount of readings. None require a deep computer science or policy background, but either of those or both would help.




Active:

Computer Science Project Tutorial (Undergraduate: COSC-302, Graduate: COSC-999)

Available for undergraduate independent study . Individual experimental work related to computer science. Student must make arrangements with a project supervisor and file a proposal endorsed by the supervisor. Written report to be submitted upon completion of work.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor


Class information: Spring 2016

All Semesters

Computer Science Project Tutorial (Undergraduate: COSC-302, Graduate: COSC-999)

Available for undergraduate independent study. Individual experimental work related to computer science. Student must make arrangements with Prof. Burger and file a proposal endorsed by him. Written report to be submitted upon completion of work.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor