Research

Distributed algorithms help agents work together to solve problems. My research studies these algorithms in dynamic network settings where attributes such as the participants and communication topology are unknown and perhaps even changing over time. These settings are increasingly relevant as networked computation becomes more ubiquitous. This reality opens a compelling opportunity to develop the theoretical foundations necessary to support reliable computation in an increasingly unreliable world.

 

Projects

Below is a sampling of my projects that study distributed algorithms in dynamic network models. (Last updated: Nov. 2014)

A Theory of Shared Spectrum Networks

We study upper and lower bounds for key communication problems in the t-disrupted model, which we introduced to abstract the key behavior of shared spectrum networks by providing devices access to multiple channels while also modeling unpredictable secondary use.

Papers: [GNZ: DISC 2014], [TWNS: OPODIS 2014], [DGGKN: PODC 2013], [GGNT: OPODIS 2012], [DKN: DISC 2012], [DGKN: PODC 2012], [DGKN: DISC 2011], [DGGKC: PODC 2009], [GGKN: INFOCOM 2009], [DGGN: PODC 2008], [DGGN: DISC 2007]

A Theory of Unreliable Radio Networks

We study upper and lower bounds for key communication problems in the dual graph model, which we introduced to generalize standard radio network models to include unreliable links that behave unpredictably.

Papers: [N: DISC 2014], [GLN: PODC 2013], [GHLN: DISC 2012], [C-HGKLN: PODC 2011], [KLNOR: PODC 2010], [KLN: PODC 2009],

MAC Layer Abstractions

We present the abstract MAC layer, which enables the study of upper and lower bounds in radio networks without requiring a detailed model of low-level network behavior.

Papers: [N: PODC 2014], [GKNL: PODC 2014], [KLN: DISC 2009]

 

Funding

I am currently funded by NSF CCF proposal number 1320279, "AF: Small: Algorithms for Wireless Networks with Dynamic Links," as well by a Ford Motor Company University Research Program grant. I am the only academic PI on both grants.

 

Training

Before coming to Georgetown I was at MIT, where I received my PhD working with Nancy Lynch in the Theory of Distributed Systems group, and spent two years as a postdoctoral associate working with Hari Balakrishnan in the Networks and Mobile Systems group.

 

Teaching

In fall 2014, I am teaching the department's undergraduate discrete math requirement. The course web site can be accessed here: COSC 030 - Math Methods for Computer Science.

In spring 2014, I am teaching the graduate-level theory course. The course web site can be accessed here: COSC 545 - Theory of Computation.

In fall 2013, I am teaching an introductory undergraduate course on distributed algorithms. The course web site can be accessed here: COSC 242 - Algorithms for Distributed Systems.

In spring 2013, I am teaching the graduate-level theory course. The course web site can be accessed here: COSC 545 - Theory of Computation.

In spring 2013, I am also teaching a graduate-level topics course on wireless network algorithms. The course web site can be accessed here: COSC 747 - Topics in Wireless Network Algorithms.

In spring 2012, I am teaching the graduate-level theory course. The course web site can be accessed here: COSC 545 - Theory of Computation.

In fall 2011, I taught a graduate reading course that tackles my research interest in unconventional distributed algorithm theory. The course web site can be accessed here: COSC 547 - Distributed Computing Outside the Box.